What is Strength & Conditioning Exactly???

  This post was prompted by a recent Facebook status, which asked, “As strength and conditioning is becoming a big part of fighters training, what do coaches and fighters think it is? Weight training? Cardio? Padwork? Bag work? Core exercises? Body impact conditioning?” It's a great question, and one that certainly attracted a lot [...]

Performance Preparation: Optimised Warm-up

Forget your old perception of a warm-up and now consider a new model for optimising performance preparation for both fights and training sessions. Time is wasted and physical potential goes untapped following typical ill-conceived warm-up routines. I know it's been done to death – a warm up will promote faster muscle contraction; relax agonist [...]

Fighter Weight Training Sessions In a Nutshell

Thai boxers, like most athletes,  don't have much time to dedicate to weight training sessions. It's therefore critical to train specifically in the gym — be the most productive and get out again. Fighters must focus on strength and power development in the weights room, as these adaptations aren't maximally stressed during Thai boxing training [...]

Time Saving Multi-purpose Exercise

As fighters our exercising training time is very limited. We should spend as much time as possible practising technical and tactical Muay Thai. Time spent exercising must provide a benefit that can't be obtained during Muay Thai training or it's wasting time. Each exercise in your strength and conditioning programme must provide the biggest [...]

Correcting Muay Thai Posture Compensations

Following on from my last post, "Is Muay Thai Bad for Posture?", this time I look at some exercises that can counter balance the overuse and posture compensation that results from hours of Muay Thai training. These exercises strengthen and activate deep neck flexors and lower scapular fixators and stretch out the pectoral, upper trapezius [...]

Is Muay Thai Bad for Posture?

High training volume in any sport will lead to overuse injuries and muscular imbalances, and Muay Thai is no exception. It's true, you really can have too much of a good thing! Fighting posture is designed to defend vulnerable parts of your body against imminent attack, not promote long-term health. And Thai boxers spend a significant [...]

Neck Strengthening for Muay Thai

This post was triggered by a question asked by one of the subscribed members. As I'm sure you've all experienced first hand, the neck gets plenty of punishment during Thai boxing training let alone fighting. Subjected to sudden blows from any direction and yanked, pulled and twisted in the clinch, your neck is a [...]

Resistance Bands or Weights to Build Strength and Power?

This question comes up relatively frequently, and I thought I'd share some ideas regarding the use of resistance bands for sports performance training and of course MuayThai specifically. In theory you could achieve the same levels of resistance from both bands and weights, however the nature of the load is very different. Bands produce [...]

Strengthen antagonist muscles to get faster?

Today at the gym we had a rowing athlete training Olympic lifting. In the rest intervals I took the opportunity to discuss with her the programme prescribed to her by her rowing club. As we chatted, the topic of exercise selection arose. Although rowing is predominantly a lower body movement, the upper-body contribution is [...]

By | 2017-04-28T17:46:12+00:00 September 5th, 2012|Injury Prevention, Programme Design, Strength, Written Post|5 Comments

Restoring Muscle Tissue Quality

So far on this training trip in Thailand, I've had a traditional Thai massage following each Muay Thai training session. It's a luxury I couldn't afford back home, but this kind of soft tissue therapy is crucial for the long term quality and function of your muscle tissue. This tissue can change in two [...]

By | 2017-04-28T17:52:26+00:00 August 9th, 2012|Injury Prevention, Mobility, Recovery, Written Post|0 Comments

Olympic Hamstring Strains – Shouldn’t Happen!

Another athlete pulls up, limping from running track at the London Olympic Stadium 2012. And the team's strength and conditioning coaches hold their heads in their hands – because they've failed to prepare the athlete. These strains shouldn't happen if training is conducted properly. The hamstring group are a secondary hip extensor, and should [...]

By | 2017-04-28T17:54:40+00:00 August 5th, 2012|Coaching, Injury Prevention|1 Comment